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a lot of time in california, illinois, new york, texas. those are four states that the candidates did not spend much time if at all this year with the exception of going to fund raise. that shows how different things are now. >> woodruff: richard, it's certainly not that there hasn't been partisanship. it's a matter of... whether there's been geographic partisanship. >> that's well put, judy. ohio, for example, for most of its history for well over 100 years has stood out. it's been the mother of presidents and the maker of presidents. it's the country in microcosm. it is urban. it is rural. it is agricultural. it is industrial. it is a strong tradition of organized labor. it has significant minority populations. if you were going to disstill the united states in the mid 20th century at the end of the 20th century, you know, you'd be hard pressed to do better than ohio. in some ways it makes a lot of sense that ohio has attracted as much attention as it has. >> ifill: michael and richard, let's think about california. big, big state. very diverse. densely populated. has farms. it has
out of brooklyn and move to california, where the sunshine was constant, where everybody was pretty and good looking and... uh... i left the day i graduated high school. ♪ ♪ if you're in doubt about angels being real ♪ my image of california was a movie image of california. there were beaches and surf, everybody was rich, big houses, big cars. i was sleeping on a couch in my brother's apartment, and one day this guy walked over to me and said, "would you like to be in a movie?" and i said, "yeah!" and i was an extra in "explosive generation." i actually haven't seen it since it came out, but i know that i'm in there somewhere. wait till i tell larry, i bet it's him she's talking about. hey, maybe it's me! oh, sure it's you! geffen: i didn't really have an idea of what hollywood really was. it was just the place where they made movies, and, you know, i was a child of the movies. there were two theaters in my neighborhood in brooklyn, had a double feature change every week and i went to both of them. that was my favorite time of every week. ethel merman: ♪ there's no business
the campaign. >> remember when carl drove they did a bunch of california events at the end of their race when george w. bush was running just to get inside the opponent's head. don't overestimate the maturity of what's going on. >> woodruff: i'm told they have senate races that we are prepared to call. i'm just looking at what time it is. it's 22 minutes after 9:00 on the east coast. we are able to project for the pennsylvania senate that bob casey is returning for a second term. >> ifill: he beat tom smith who was a very well known tea-part candidate. he put a lot of money in. >> $20 million of his own money. the democratic incumbent wins in michigan. >> woodruff: i remember the day when there weren't that many women. we've just announced three in a row. here in texas someone who will replace a woman in the senate. he is ted cruz. he has been very closely affiliated with the tea party. this is a win for the republicans in the state of texas and a very important win. >> ifill: and a rising star in the republican party. he had a big turn at the republican national convention as i recall. >> he
want to bring up quickly california where there are a number of issues on the ballot. having to do with taxes. and a number of other topics. >> california is really ground zero for the initiative process. they tend to have more initiatives than any other state. they have 11 this year including two competing measures that would increase taxes in different ways to fund education and help balance the state budget. >> woodruff: we also know that health care is on the ballot. remind us where and what that would mean if those were to pass. >> sure. there are five states that have votes on the affordable care act this year. in missouri, it's bill that would prohibit the state from setting up a health insurance exchange. in the other four states it's a broader measure that attempts to block really implementation of the affordable care act. it sets up the right to have private insurance as a constitutional right in the state and prohibits the state from requiring anybody to buy insurance or penalizing anybody for failing to buy insurance. >> woodruff: and just quickly what are the polls sho
jersey as cokie pointed out but also places like california which are states that he would have won anyway but there was so much organic enthusiasm for barack obama in 2008 that he won -- that a lot of people turned out even in deep blue states where their votes, of course, didn't count, they turned out in mass numbers. the president's people knee this year that's not going to happen. so in terms of the overall national popular vote, if you think about red states and blue states where neither campaign is trying to turn out the vote, the blue states like california and new york for various reasons the president's numbers won't be anywhere near as strong as they were in 2008 whereas in the deep red state there is's so much antipathy towards the president that people will turn out in those states even though they are deep red states. they'll turn out the cast a symbolic vote against barack obama. so that's one thing that skews the popular vote by conceivably on election day towards romney more than people are necessarily expecting >> i think that's absolutely right. the red states are
and congressional races on the ballot in california. and older americans are working longer and returning to the workforce after retiring. you can help paul solman look into that demographic shift. if you're an older worker, fill out a questionnare on the rundown. all that and more is on our website jeff? >> brown: and again, to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are eight more. >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer producti
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)